Filthy Fingers

7:13 AM Tuesday, February 8, 2011


I had a professor at college that announced one day that, “You should never trust a man with perfect finger nails.” with that statement I became a fan of his classes of which I think I took three. My background was from a farm, an agricultural community. Our community was so dependent on agriculture that we closed school for two weeks in the fall so the kids could help with the harvest.

When a kid took school off for harvest and didn't work that placed them in a different category, they where seen as somebody that didn't know how to work. What my professor validated was, don't trust anybody that doesn't do. The implication is that they don't understand.

For those of you that have degrees and are using those degrees today, when did you learn the most about what you do for a living? Did you learn more in the classroom or the first year or two out in the field plying your skills? So it has been stated many times before, differently, and most likely better, but when it comes to the martial arts, don't have perfect finger nails, get dirty, get slivers, get them smashed, get some dirt under the nails.

Reading a book, watching a DVD, or Youtube are great means of broadening your horizons. Using any available means to increase your knowledge and skills are great, but don't forget to get your fingers nails dirty. If you don't you may be like kids that never worked harvest, they never had filthy fingers.

3 comments:

  1. Excellent post, great points:

    when did you learn the most about what you do for a living?

    Ans: For me, it was not in the class room. I spent personal time researching and studying but in the end it was the application that taught me the most.

    Did you learn more in the classroom or the first year or two out in the field plying your skills?

    Ans: Field work, doing it, even in karate or Tai chi I found I could learn and apply faster if I got out there and did it over and over again.

    Charles James

  2. Charles -

    I think...check that, know that it is the practical application and the class room is only part of the formula.

    Lawrence Kane & Kris Wilder

  3. Great post. Too often students get hung up on the strategy, method, or pattern, and they forget that that ultimately matters little if they can't preform or apply the technique. I think the Peaceful Warrior said it best, something like, "Wisdom is doing."

    J. Michael Olds

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