Teenage Girl Gets Beat Down

2:21 PM Friday, February 12, 2010


OK, a teenage girl gets beat down, savagely, in a Metro Bus tunnel by another teen. And it all happens in front of paid, contracted security. Everybody is pulling their hair out over this. All the radio talk shows are going off, some calling out the manliness of the guards, companies defending the security guards, governments calling for reviews, and politicians outraged.

Everybody is in a dust up, screaming that something should have, could have, and would have been done. Me, I am going to blow right past that folderol and say this: Violence happens; there are bad people out there, intent on doing you harm. There always have been and will be.

This girl that kicked the other girl in the head; she is one of the bad people.
Now for what is the crux of this event.

What would you expect from a society that teaches compliance? From an early age, children are taught to not take matters into their own hands, to instead seek out an authority figure that has the right and the power to make things right. Further, as a kid you are taught that the defender often gets the same punishment as the offender. For example, a common policy in schools today is that both kids get expelled for fighting. So, in the Bus Tunnel incident you have security guards that likely have been taught that there is no reward for intervention,only punishment.

Now, before you go off and suggest that I think fighting resolves issues, no, my track record is pretty clear. What I am saying is you have a right to defend yourself.

The more you pull on this thread the more aspects of this event unravel, but I want to stick to this narrow point.

We now have:

1. A strata of society that follows the rules they have established for reasonable and safe interaction

2. The bad people intuitively understand that all those other people are an easy resource

These bad people know that the others will seek authority and that takes time and further that authority, often, is a paper tiger.

After review, the policies will be found to be in order; however, they will be changed a little. The guards will keep their jobs because they followed polices (and if terminated will have grounds for a lawsuit for wrongful termination). The girl that got beaten down will have a pile of medical bills and possible long- term injury. The bad girl that kicked the bejesus out of the other one will wind up in court and placed on some form of parole. And the rest of the people will avoid the bus tunnel because bad things happen there.

Talk amongst yourselves.

Also if you need more information on violence get it here: Rory Miller, the Author of Meditations on Violence, at West Seattle Karate Academy, Sat, Feb 20th. More Info

Here is the security camera footage for your review.

11 comments:

  1. Okay, this is probably going to upset a few people and to be perfectly frank and honest about it, I really don't give a flying f*ck if it does.

    Although we don't know the events that transpired prior to this taped incident, therefore we don't know what led up to it, which does not in any way shape or form give any credence whatsoever for the despicable behavior of these so called "security guards." They are an embarrassment not only to themselves, but also to anyone who has worked in that profession.

    These are the same type of people that would stand around while a woman was being raped and not do a damn thing about it. They and all human scum like them disgust me to the highest degree.

    As far as not condoning fighting, I would agree wholeheartedly. However, I do condone, promote, and encourage my students to protect themselves by whatever means necessary and to do so in an extremely decisive manner.

    Whoever said, and whoever thinks, that violence never solved anything is a complete and total idiot. No questions asked, nor excuses needed. Just go back to sticking your head in the sand or up your *ss, whichever place you frequently visit.

    I am in agreement that society is trying to turn everyone into a bunch of gutless sheep that do nothing but whine and cry to the supposed authorities who more often than not do absolutely nothing, or worse yet, take the side of the poor oppressed and down trodden piece of human crap that is causing such a blight upon our way of life.

    My dad had a saying, "You can't piss on a forest fire and expect it to go out." By the same token, you can't reason with human crap. The only thing you can do is either learn to live with it, or every time you see it, you get rid of it.

    Think about it, when you use the bathroom do you leave your crap sitting in the toilet? Or do you flush it down into the sewer where it belongs?

    What you do with real crap you can do with human crap. Don't coddle it, don't feel sorry for it, simply FLUSH IT!!!

    Charles Bronson had it right!

    osucat1

  2. I don't know what really happened, cannot make a judgement there, nor do I know what the policies of the security company are, or what those security guards were thinking - maybe it had more to do with their base pay.

    I was trained and liscenced in Security in the State of Washington for a time. Went through training with a local agency ran by an ex-deputy.

    What they told us was that our primary duty was to observe and report, but we were authorized to use force when necessary to protect property and lives (open-handed techniques only was their policy).
    We were not only authorized, it was mandated, that was our job. This company had everything from unarmed desk jockies to armed security patrol cars, many of which were overseen by off-duty cops.

    The policies for their company and if they were in a different state with different liscencing laws, these may have played a role.
    However, something like that should have been a no-brainer. It would have been justifiable as a citizen to step in and do something about it, so I honestly cannot see why someone would stand idly by unless they just did not care.

    That is really sad.

    ZenHG

  3. I do have to agree that the "paid" security was a joke. These kinds of events are why they are supposed to be there. I have friends that work in security, and they would lose their jobs for letting this happen, especially if the cameras caught them just watching.

    I agree too that violence has it's place. Self-defense is a right of self and I can't stand the idea that if someone attacks me with a knife or a gun and I hit them, and then they wind up with head injuries IT'S MY FAULT? Bull. Just like buying a car - buyer beware - you never know who is going to be on the other end of your knife.

    I've never been in a fight as I've been able to talk my way out of them (including one guy trying to literally haul me out of my car), but I have to agree that there is too much punishment handed down on the defender these days. That's a big part of the reason why I try to avoid violence.

    To a martial artist, a first-degree black belt only means I've got a decent grasp of my basics. To the cops and a jury of "my peers", it means that I'm a finely tuned killing machine from the Cobra-Kai dojo, ready to unleash some Bloodsport style carnage on anyone with a pulse.

    Man, I couldn't kill my way out of a paper bag, but they don't know that.

    Ash

  4. reminds me of the passivity of cattle in a pasture .while one of their number is being pulled down by wolves they continue to placidly chew their cud unconcerned.

    vic

  5. I think the video is not really showing what the security saw. Here is what I mean, I myself have been in one or to judo matches & for the life of me could not tell you what happened it all seem to happen to fast. But then I will go back & look at a video of this way to fast match & it looks like I just sat there & let it all just happen. I think we are all looking at the same thing here. I am sure the security in that bus tunnel have seen teens & adults puff up, bark at each other maybe push each other then nothing more. To me it looks like that is what the security is expecting & by the time they realize that this is the real deal fight its over. drawing from my personal experience I could see myself miss judging the situation or not reacting in time to be any help & it looking like I should have on video.
    But from what I hear two to girls have been at each other for some time before this day, with parents & school faculty being witness. Now it may not be part of the bus securities job to jump in. But it is the parents & school faculties job to step in & show some leadership & guidance before simple rivalry like this gets out of hand. How many beatings & school shootings are we going to see on the news before we have learned that aggression only gets worse if given a blind eye in hopes of it just blowing over. The problem that the two girls had with each other should have been addressed & dealt with long before this.

    erik_mccray

  6. 1969, Springfield Ohio South High School. Sitting at lunch with friends, my buddy turned casually to talk to some girls in our proximity and soon was assaulted by the boyfriend of one. My buddy assumed a fetal position on the floor and did not raise a hand in his defense hoping to avoid the inevitable suspension for fighting. Fully three dozen students reported to the principal he never hit back in the 30 second or so he was being hit and kicked by the assailant until teachers could break it up. The assailant was never referred to the police and BOTH students were indeed expelled. Fortunately for students and unfortunately for the staff, word quickly went around our school (where racial tensions were high to begin with and a couple years earlier there had been a knife killing on campus in a fight over lunch money extortion) quickly that if you were assaulted you would get suspended anyway, SO FIGHT BACK.

    Arf Bunkwall

  7. "It would have been justifiable as a citizen to step in and do something about it"

    I cosign that.

    A good friend of mine was an employee for a large security company here in South Florida. There policy was indeed to observe and report. Their presence was designed to deter crime and not to cope with it. It was this company's policy also to fire those that got involved, perhaps to prevent the security guards from becoming a bunch of Batman's or sheriffs from the wild west.

    Either way, I think it would've been pretty safe for anybody to stop the beat down while the girl was stomping on other girl's head.

    Abruña

  8. Well, it is terrible for sure, and I don't disagree with what Kris has written by any means.

    We do live in a very "me" society these days where I think many folks think twice about intervening due to the repercussions they think they might face. People are not concerned enough with one anothers well being.

    However, I have also read many accounts of people freezing through watching someone else get nearly beat to death, and in fact I have seen similar events happen myself.

    I personally have had the living crap beaten out of me by (I think) three people in way back in high school, they joined in at different times, but it was three guys whoopin' on me.

    The crowd did nothing.. I had to run away into a ditch and hide, basically. I have seen both teachers and police just watch violence happen before, I don't think it's that unusual.

    I was not nearly so badly injured as the victim in this situation, but I think it's worth examining the idea that this is not that uncommon an occurrence, and that maybe some kind of analysis is worth more than simple moral condemnation of the individuals involved.

    I have no idea whether these guards did what they did out of some fear reaction, or just some callus sense of self interest, or fear of breaking company policy or some such... my suspicions are probably a bit of all three.

    As much as a part of me wants to jump down their throats, another part of me wonders who they were...were they really "security guards", or were they kids not far out of high school themselves who are walking around in uniforms getting paid minimum wage?

    Obviously that doesn't excuse the behavior, but if you stop trying to view them as "authority figures" (maybe they were, maybe they weren't...there are plenty of security guards who are similarly toothless)and view them as simply bystanders to violence...then sadly their behavior isn't that unusual.

    Also I will throw this out there, it may come out as unfeeling to some, I assure you it's not intended that way:

    Depending on where you grow up, and the kind of life you have led, people getting the crap beaten out of them on street is not that unusual at all.

    All I would expect out of most folks (not saying it's right, just what i'd expect) is that they would notify the authorities. Direct intervention in violence isn't something most people are ready to do, for better or worse. And if they are, likely they have had some training or experience in doing so.

    Everyone always says they would be the one to intervene, I hope that is true, but personally I take it with a grain of salt, no offense guys.

    The difference here is that there are "security guards" not intervening rather than simply civilians.

    As mentioned previously though, i know for a fact that both the training and parameters of action allowed on many of these jobs is quite limited, maybe the problem is putting someone out there as a "security guard" that is so toothless.

    zzrzinn

  9. Well, it is terrible for sure, and I don't disagree with what Kris has written by any means.

    We do live in a very "me" society these days where I think many folks think twice about intervening due to the repercussions they think they might face. People are not concerned enough with one anothers well being.

    However, I have also read many accounts of people freezing through watching someone else get nearly beat to death, and in fact I have seen similar events happen myself.

    I personally have had the living crap beaten out of me by (I think) three people in way back in high school, they joined in at different times, but it was three guys whoopin' on me.

    The crowd did nothing.. I had to run away into a ditch and hide, basically. I have seen both teachers and police just watch violence happen before, I don't think it's that unusual.

    I was not nearly so badly injured as the victim in this situation, but I think it's worth examining the idea that this is not that uncommon an occurrence, and that maybe some kind of analysis is worth more than simple moral condemnation of the individuals involved.

    I have no idea whether these guards did what they did out of some fear reaction, or just some callus sense of self interest, or fear of breaking company policy or some such... my suspicions are probably a bit of all three.

    As much as a part of me wants to jump down their throats, another part of me wonders who they were...were they really "security guards", or were they kids not far out of high school themselves who are walking around in uniforms getting paid minimum wage?

    Obviously that doesn't excuse the behavior, but if you stop trying to view them as "authority figures" (maybe they were, maybe they weren't...there are plenty of security guards who are similarly toothless)and view them as simply bystanders to violence...then sadly their behavior isn't that unusual.

    Also I will throw this out there, it may come out as unfeeling to some, I assure you it's not intended that way:

    Depending on where you grow up, and the kind of life you have led, people getting the crap beaten out of them on street is not that unusual at all.

    All I would expect out of most folks (not saying it's right, just what i'd expect) is that they would notify the authorities. Direct intervention in violence isn't something most people are ready to do, for better or worse. And if they are, likely they have had some training or experience in doing so.

    Everyone always says they would be the one to intervene, I hope that is true, but personally I take it with a grain of salt, no offense guys.

    The difference here is that there are "security guards" not intervening rather than simply civilians.

    As mentioned previously though, i know for a fact that both the training and parameters of action allowed on many of these jobs is quite limited, maybe the problem is putting someone out there as a "security guard" that is so toothless.

    zzrzinn

  10. There is an intersection in Spokane that I use quite often in the course of the day to perform my job. This intersection is under construction and traffic is limited to only two directions. The traffic lights have not been adjusted and continue to operate as if there was 4 directions of travel. When I pull up to this traffic light I treat the solid red light as though it is flashing red. I yield to on-coming traffic for their comfort, and proceed. I have watched others stop and wait for the light to turn green, even when you can clearly see that it is perfectly safe to proceed. I suspect that if a police officer saw me roll through the red he may pull me over but I suspect he would not give me a ticket because common sense tells you that it is safe to proceed. Most officers that I have met are reasonable people.
    Each person develops a life philosophy, standards and rules. We try to live by those the best we can. We encourage others to develop good life rules and standards. We teach our families, friends and others. These are the things we have the ability to influence. As I've told my children,"Each of us is responsible for the safety and well fair of those we have influence over". Unfortunately gentlemen/ladies, common sense is not the rule of law in this world we live in. We must be faithful to the laws we have personally come to embrace.

    Jeff Pyper

  11. Interesting video. I don't know what was going on there, but those guys sure came off as incompetent boobs for just standing there.

    Most security guards are a joke.

    Matt

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